Monday, August 24, 2009

FOR SEAFOOD LOVERS

Yerseke, in Province Zeeland, at the border of Netherlands with Belgium, is famous with its mussel and oyster farms. The village with about six thousand inhabitants organizes A Mussel Day in August every year. People comes from far away to taste their mussels and oysters. This kind of farming is also the main industry in this place.
We had to drive for hours to get there but when a plate of seafood was served then we knew that the long drive was worth doing. Besides, on a warm summer night it was very beautiful to walk along the Yerseke harbour.






Enjoy Fruit de Mare! (a dish of different kind of seafood)


Yerseke has also an art touch in their buildings or village centre.

Thursday, August 20, 2009

A GLIMPSE OF ROTTERDAM

After biking around Kinderdijk on the sunny hot day yesterday, I went to Rotterdam to spend my afternoon. I parked my car in the area called Museumkwartier, it means an area for museums.
I share some pictures here.


Next to my car, I saw this restauration project : Here is the restauration of foundation of the State Monument Arminius. I always feel good to see this kind of sign, it means positive for monuments. They do something and don't abandon it.

Arminius, podium for arts, culture and debate keeps open during restauration for renting and cultural programs.

Museum Boymans-van Beuningen, exhibits the history of art, from the Middle Ages to the 21st century. From Bosch, Rembrandt and Van Gogh to DalĂ­ and Dutch Design.

A house for collection of works of the painter/sculptor Henk Chabot (1895-1949)



The Netherlands Architecture Institute (NAi)
A heaven for urban development and architecture interests.

WORLD HERITAGE SITE : KINDERDIJK

Well, it is summer, sunny and the temperature even reached 29 degree Celcius! On this hot day yesterday, 19 August, I decided to bike around Kinderdijk, one of the World Heritage Site in the Netherlands, close to Rotterdam.

I quoted from the link above the information :


19 Windmills Combined


The mill network at Kinderdijk dates from the middle of the 18th century and basically comprises two rows of drainage mills working in parallel. Because of their function it would be better to speak of ‘reservoir’ mills: they lift water from a lower-lying ‘boezem’ (reservoir or polder drainage pool) to a higher boezem. Both rows independently drained a polder area further down in the Alblasserwaard. This ‘waard’, or holm, covers roughly 24,000 hectares, divided over the (former) water board districts of the Nederwaard and the Overwaard.

The facing rows each have eight mills of equal capacity dating from 1738 and 1740. There are also three other mills, which effectively are also drainage mills.

The mills are still in operating order, but are put to little use and are no longer essential for drainage. Two steam-driven pumping stations were installed at Kinderdijk in 1868. One of these stations – the Wisboom pumping station - still exists, but its function has been taken over by an electrically driven pump.


I shared some pictures here.




Monday, August 17, 2009

PESTA RAKYAT

Beginilah kalau orang-orang Indonesia di Belanda merayakan Pesta Kemerdekaan RI yang ke 64, di Sekolah Indonesia di Wassenaar, 15 Agustus 2009. Dijamin puas dengan berbagai makanan Indonesia, hiburan musik (dangdut paling popoler!) dan boleh joget sepuasnya. Cuaca cerah sekali dan buat ukuran Belanda cuaca yang cerah termasuk rezeki yang patut disyukuri.










HOMESICK?

I visited "Pasar Perron" in the Train Museum Utrecht last Friday. Pasar Perron is an annual event in the museum in August. All programs and food are about Indonesia or even more precise : the Netherlands Indie.

If I smell the food, see the durian, the becak, listening the music on the stage, looking around the batik stalls plus enjoying the exhibition about old trains and stations in Indonesia, I hardly feel that I am that far away from home. So magic to feel so close to Indonesia when I am more than ten thousand miles away.




Friday, August 14, 2009

DELTA PROJECT

One of the biggest man-made structure in the world is Delta Project in Province Zeeland, the Netherlands. The ambition was to manage the sea water to keep some part of the country dry and liveable after the flood disaster in 1953.



The red lines are the Delta Project

NAP is Normaal Amsterdams Peil, that means average water level of the North Sea. In 1953 it exceeded the normal level and about 1.800 people died of the flood.







Appreciation of the nature conservation in the area.

Create the Delta Project as a tourist attraction.



Public education.

The Delta Project keeps the surrounding areas dry including the city of Veere.


And the city of Middelburg.